T-SQL Tuesday #65 – Overcoming Variable Limitations in SQLCmd Mode

It’s time again for that T-SQL blog party T-SQL Tuesday, and this month’s host is Mike Donnelly (blog|@SQLMD). If you want to join in the blog party, take a look at Mike’s announcement for an explanation of the topic and rules for participating: T-SQL Tuesday #065 – Teach Something New. My contribution this week is about overcoming the variable limitations of SQLCmd mode. Most people know what SQLCmd is, the command line SQL client utility for running T-SQL, or perhaps
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Why is Your SQL Server Slow? All-for-one and One-for-all

I have one more thing I want to talk about regarding the conversation I had recently with my friends and former colleagues at Idera about the things that slow down SQL Server. Another “quick performance wins” you can take advantage of is segregating the types of files SQL Server uses. If you install SQL Server by just clicking NEXT until you get to the end, you end up with everything running on the same drive. Different files have different types
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Why is Your SQL Server Slow? Here’s a Hint

I was talking recently with my friends and former colleagues at Idera about the things that slow down SQL Server. Specifically, the discussion was about things that people could change without a lot of trouble to make their SQL Server run faster. I like to use the phrase “quick performance wins” for these easy-to-fix issues that can generate a considerable performance boost. This conversation led to a whitepaper on 5 things that are making your SQL Servers slow. Watch Idera’s
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T-SQL Tuesday #49: Wait For It Roundup

A huge round of applause and my thanks to all of the participants and spectators for this month’s edition of T-SQL Tuesday. I hope I didn’t keep you waiting too long for the roundup. <rimshot> Let’s take a look at this month’s participating blog posts: Fellow Certified Master (MCM) Rob Farley (blog|@rob_farley) led off with Waiting, waiting…. Rob talks about what causes SQL Server (and computers in general) to be slow and how to baseline SQL Server waits to detect
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T-SQL Tuesday #49: My Go-To Query For Waiting Tasks

I’m not just hosting T-SQL Tuesday, I’m a customer as well. Err, I mean participant. Topic for this month’s T-SQL Tuesday, hosted by yours truly, is … wait for it … Waits and Queues. For my donation to this little blog party, I’m contributing my favorite go-to query for waiting tasks. Do you ever get complaints that SQL Server is “slow”? Yeah, that’s a helpful report, right? when I get those kinds of reports, I like to take a quick
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Never an Infinite Loop Around When You Need One

You may be thinking, “You’re a DBA. I thought DBAs hated infinite loops.” Well, you’re right, most of the time. As with most things, there are times when infinite loops can be useful, as long as there is some attainable condition that breaks us out of it. I found myself in need of one such loop one day at work recently. I had a SQL job that was failing in production because it could not verify that the login had
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T-SQL Tuesday #49: Topic is … Wait for It …

Have you been waiting to hear about this month’s T-SQL Tuesday topic? Here’s the announcement, right here and right now. The topic for this month’s T-SQL Tuesday is … wait for it … What? Still waiting? Well, suspend your confusion because that’s it. The topic is (queue the fanfare) Waits. As in “Why is my query waiting?”. As in sys-dot-dee-em-underscore-oh-ess-underscore-waiting-underscore-tasks. Err, I mean sys.dm_os_waiting_tasks. Give us your most interesting post involving waits (wait types, queues, DMV queries, etc) next Tuesday,
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Looking for Buried Treasure in the Transaction Log

Lately, I’ve been finding more and more reasons to look in the transaction log for investigative purposes. Questions come up quite regularly asking how to determine who performed some action such as deleting data, changing logins, or disabling jobs. The first reaction may be that if you aren’t auditing for the specific action, you’re out of luck. You can always set up an audit or some other tracking mechanism and catch them the next time they do it. With a
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Bug: sys.dm_db_session_space_usage Reporting Extremely High Tempdb Allocations

A little more than a year ago while working at Idera, I was consulted on reports from a few clients using the Idera monitoring tool SQL diagnostic manager (SQLdm). SQLdm was reporting very high numbers for internal object allocations (internal_objects_alloc_page_count) and very low numbers for internal object deallocations (internal_objects_dealloc_page_count) to the point that SQLdm showed that individual sessions were reported using more space than was available in the database. I worked with Vicky Harp (blog|@vickyharp), SQLdm dev lead and an
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Day 30 of 31 Days of Disaster Recovery (T-SQL Tuesday #40): Using Partial Availability and Initialize from Backup to Replicate a Partial Database

It’s been a tough and long road to 31 Days of Disaster Recovery. It’s been very difficult coming up with quality topic ideas for the series as we near the end. For day 30 of the series, I am combining a post on performing piecemeal restores with a post on filegroups for T-SQL Tuesday #40 and a post on replication. In case you’re not familiar with T-SQL Tuesday, let me enlighten you. This blog entry is participating in T-SQL Tuesday
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